Category Archives: 30 Minutes or Less

Scattered nuts

IMG_1972A while back, I introduced a local cake made from nut flour, the basbousa.  I’ve become so addicted that baking one has pretty much become my Friday morning ritual…after a double espresso, that is.  It’s so easy to throw together, though, you could even start before that first cup is brewed.

This basbousa is a little more rustic than the traditional version.  Instead of adorning the pieces with neatly placed whole almonds, I opted for the less fussy scattering of coarsely chopped pieces, guaranteeing the crunch and amazing flavor of toasted almonds in each bite.

Pour another espresso, plate up a couple of pieces of warm basbousa and some fruit, and open up that newspaper.  It’s the weekend; start your own tradition!!!

Almond Basbousa
Pistachio Cardamom Rose Basbousa

Berries bite back

IMG_1887One of the things I love about traveling is that it forces me to try new foods and new combinations of familiar foods.  I am forever grateful for Italy for introducing me to a surprising combo that stole my heart, fragole con aceto balsamico — fresh strawberries drizzled in balsamic vinegar.  Most of the time, it’s served as a dessert, but paired with the peppery bite of arugula and the amazingly tangy taste of plum tomatoes, it makes a wonderfully simple lunch on a summer day or a stunning accompaniment to grilled steak or chicken.

Strawberry and Tomato Salad

Cultured self-indulgence?

20140802-144700-53220089.jpgEach weekend, I try to get out and explore another facet of this small country.  Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy a boozy brunch now and then, too, but if that’s all I did with my weekends, no amount of working out could keep the weight off.  More importantly, I’d have squandered an opportunity to experience the culture and history of a place I’d lived in for a full year.

One of those adventures also led me to a tasty discovery, basbousa.  Normally made with semolina, the woman running the museum cafe assured me that their version was gluten, dairy, and egg free.  It was so moist, tender, and sweet without being cloyingly so.  Sadly for me, the fact that yogurt is dairy got lost in translation.

Unfortunate reaction aside, the dessert did lead to another delicious experiment with nut flours — this time pistachios — inspired by a flavor combination borrowed from an Eid favorite, gulab jamun — cardamom and rose.  The result, Pistachio Cardamom Rose Basbousa, isn’t authentic Arabic, but to me, it captures the spirit of this island and the cultural melting pot that it has become over thousands of years.

Here’s the challenge:  the recipe has you cut the basbousa before drizzling it with the rose syrup to make cutting/serving easier.  It also means that, in mere minutes, once the basbousa has cooled, practically nothing is left to slow your consumption except will power and good friends.  Okay, at least you might feel a bit more cultured than you would after a boozy brunch…

 

“Can” Do

I know the thought of canned fish makes a lot of folks cringe, but for me, it verges on comfort food.  Growing up, I ate it at least as often, if not more than chicken. In the midwest, seafood wasn’t exactly plentiful, and despite our “middle class” status, my parents had three kids to feed and a house and car to pay off on their small salaries.  Making sure we could to live in a neighborhood that afforded access to good schools was more important than what clothes we wore or how fancy the food was on our plates.

I’m lucky enough to have access to a plentiful selection of fresh fish these days, but as I ran through the market after work I spotted a tin of smoked salmon in olive oil and thought “why not?”

Tossed with some arugula and a little quinoa pasta, it makes an easy, and delicious post-run recovery meal (or post-work recovery meal if you’ve had one of those days…).

Smoked Salmon and Arugula Pasta

A kiss that leaves you wanting more

20140613-093728-34648897.jpg Have you ever eaten out and tried a dish with an ingredient or two that you’ve never had before, just to see what all the fuss was about? After a week of uninspired, hotel restaurant meals on a recent business trip, I finally escaped the hum-drum monotony of dishes prepared to satisfy the tastes of travelers from anywhere and everywhere and ventured out to find something, anything different.

I’m guessing there is an Arabic version of Foursquare, Yelp, or pick your favorite trusty food guide, but since I haven’t found one yet, and I don’t read or speak Arabic, I was out of luck and had to take my chances.  I settled on a Mediterranean-North African restaurant, all but guaranteed to find something I hadn’t tried, at least in the preceding week. Anyway, back to the important part… the food.  I ordered a dish with with a pomegranate glaze. I’ve drunk my share of pomegranate juice, but I just couldn’t imagine how concentrating that flavor wouldn’t overpower the dish. Oh, man, was I wrong. It was ah-mazing, like a perfectly balanced symphony, each bite tempting me onto the next.

Of course I had to recreate it!  I picked up a tube of harissa, a few pomegranates, and a bottle of pomegranate molasses the very next trip to the market. A half dozen chicken breasts later, I thought I was going nuts. Why was it so hard to figure out?  Turns out I was so focused on the sauce that I forgot about the most important part, seasoning the chicken. Once I took the spices out of the glaze and used them to punch up my otherwise bland chicken breasts before glazing, things started looking up. A few minutes together in the pan was just the tantalizingly, tangy kiss that I was looking for.

Harissa-rubbed Chicken with Pomegranate Glaze and Herbed Quinoa

Lunching in Tuscany

20140531-155554-57354274.jpgIt’s just starting to get hot here – like 100F hot – and thankfully the humidity hasn’t kicked into full steam mode.  Still, it’s hard to think about eating anything heavy, especially in the middle of the day.  And, who wants to slave over an oven or range when you’ve escaped the heat outside?

A few cans, a few minutes at the cutting board, and presto chango —

Insalata di Tonno e Fagioli (Tuna and Cannellini Bean Salad)

Now, pour yourself a nice, chilled white wine and pretend you’re in Tuscany!

Chorizo for breakfast

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If I’m making breakfast for family and friends, I’ll make something sweet, because I like to bake, especially for company.  When it’s just me, though, I usually make something on the savory side. Back when I could eat eggs and dairy, I would make a pretty mean frittata or omelet.  Nowadays, its a tofu scramble with whatever is left in my vegetable drawer at the end of the week.

This morning, with a bunch of cilantro and an avocado, I didn’t exactly have the makings for a scramble, but I did have the inspiration for a flavorful hash.  Yes, a tofu scramble would be a lot healthier, but after a 25km hike with a 10 kilo pack, I decided to treat myself to this Chorizo Hash.  Don’t skip or skimp on the avocado!  It really balances the acidity and spice of the chorizo nicely.

Cashew “Crack”

20140520-181207-65527791.jpgA colleague and good friend is leaving the island, and I wanted to do something to see him off, but my baking has been limited by an almost total lack of GF supplies.  I can find a flour blend or two, but they just don’t seem to be up to the task, and I can’t find xanthan or guar gum to save my life.

Lately, I’ve been experimenting with nut flours with great results (check out these Peanut Butter Cookies).  My friend loves cashews, and so I thought, “why not substitute cashew butter?”  At first I thought they might not have enough flavor, but a few tweaks and voila Cashew “Crack” Cookies, a wicked combination of crunchy and chewy that you can’t stop eating, even though you know you should.

 

Oh hammour

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It didn’t take long for me to start talking about food with my local friends. Everyone has their favorite kababji, but the food vaies only slightly depending on whether the spice blend used is Iranian or Iraqi influenced or Turkish or Lebanese.  More often than not, the decision on where to go seems to comes down to the juice and sheesha options.

After several days in a row of dinners consisting almost entirely of meat (and an occasional chicken kabob for good measure), I needed a change, or possibly more appropriately, an intervention.  The menu said hammour with citrus, coriander, and chile, and it mentioned a side of steamed vegetables, which in itself was starting to seem worth the price of the plate.  I freaked out a little when I saw the bright yellow sauce, but one taste, and I was won over.

Grilled Hammour (grouper) with Mango, Chile, and Cilantro Sauce

I’ve made this recipe a few times now, and the sauce was just as awesome on a grilled salmon fillet.  Watch out, though, the chiles sneak up on you.

Fisherman’s Masala


One of the best things about living on an island is the abundance of fresh seafood.  Even better, on this island you can find a plethora of whole and ground spices in the souk for pocket change.  Even though I know they won’t keep forever, I’m already daydreaming about what I will ship home when it comes time to leave (spices only…not the fish!).  And, since I can find all those whole spices, why not try my hand at making my own curry powders, like this machali masala.

Fresh tomatoes, on the other hand, are harder to come by since it’s so hot here, especially tomatoes that haven’t been refrigerated.  So, the other day made a chutney out of them, which I’ve been eating on pretty much everything until I can find a mold to make idlis.

Now, back to the seafood and spices…  Thakkali chatni is also a perfect complement to mild flavored seafood.  Put them all together, and you have a healthy, quick, and tasty weeknight supper.

Curry Dusted Scallops with Spicy Tomato Chutney

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